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tennessee, despite her in. >> thank you, mr. chairman. commissioner mcdowell reference the wicca conference. chairman genachowski, weiss title ii still open? >> is common to have notices for this public interest and common as there has been here. we don't see uncertainty created by the preceding. the sector is quite strong and investment innovation going up to two geeks and there's uncertainty come from litigation. as i've done before, i called verizon to withdraw its litigation. that would increase certainty and allow us all to move forward. >> blow, have you had any discussions with the other commissioners chairman. you want to weigh in on that? >> real quick out respectfully disagree. when i speak with wall street analysts, that's one of the first questions i get is that of the future of the title ii docket at the time in 2010 there was an incredible amount of anxiety from the investment community over the docket. if it only comes up in conversations i have with international counterparts internationally. it does create uncertainty in the litigation against the order regarding regulation
government. >> mr. chairman, encourager requesting your concerns. >> a day to ask her second pin with a great way to the witness panel beginning with steve haydee who was hurt and served for three consecutive mandates as the armed groups experts on the drc. investigate and co-authored reports submitted and presented to the u.n. security council sanctions committee during the groups expire 2012 mandate he was also coordinator of the six member team working under security council resolution 2021. prior to joining the group of experts, mr. hege worked with organizations. really here with john prendergast, cofounder of the enough project, initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. these are the quick administration and the state department congress. he's worked with unicef, human rights, international crisis group and episode five and help launch the sentinel project pictures clingy. mr. prendergast to search for peace in africa for well over a quarter century. then we would hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at hanford university server is petitioned the professor,
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
the opportunity to work with our next speaker, was mr. gill by president obama affirmed by the u.s. senate as the direct her of drug control policy in the white house. in this position coordinates all aspects of federal drug programs and implementation of the president's national drug control strategy. he brings 37 years of him for his manager policy experience and most recently served as chief of police for seattle washington where he last ran at its lowest point in 40 years. [applause] >> well, good morning and thank you very much for being here. this is a wonderful opportunity for me to associate again the future report with dr. walkoff and the staff that supports dr. johnson in the work he has done. the assistant secretary of health, dr. koh could not be a stronger partner on these issues in his words about the health of young people and responsibility we have as adults they think are particularly important. i'm looking forward to hearing from you and it's always a great pleasure to be with dr. johnson who has given us the information that helps so much and not only making policy, but
conservatives and liberal democrats have gone along with all of it. may i say, mr. speaker, what a pity he not to see the honorable member be secure in her place. from the jungle, she may not have it succeeded in talking to the nation on many things. but she did think for the nation when she called the prime minister of the chancellor [inaudible] [cheers] mr. speaker. no wonder this prime minister keeps on losing his temper. because his worst nightmare is coming through. economic credibility as part of an constant and unfair. yes, he is the chancellor. can someone get him out of here? [cheers] mr. speaker. fiscal rule is broken on every target that they set themselves. failing and failing. 212 billion pounds more borrowing than they promised two years ago. [inaudible] unfair, incompetent, and completely out of touch. before he heard my statement and before he let at the forecast. we don't jiggle the numbers in the treasury anywhere. that's when he was in the treasury. the budget responsibility and that is the problem he's got. his whole honesty was about complaining it is going to. that's
together the president now says he means it and we say you are right to munich, mr. president. we sure do have your back. his searing tv sketchiness news conference, as the title shipped to her military force to be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day and never ever of congress i know of will be behind the president. but what do you do with the weapons themselves? >> that's the lesson of libya. if we did not have sufficient control of the arms caches all over the place and obviously those weapons have gone to places that we didn't want them to do. the second major issue is the increasing ambrogi hobbyist, al qaeda on the ground fighting very well, by the way, that issue is going to be a very serious challenge. the longer this goes on, the bigger challenges. [inaudible] >> secretary of state if i understand correctly is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the american state department meeting with our allies. one of the things that reference for recognition of the new searing national council is something we'd be doing t
in a deal to gentlelady who has her notes all they are. they'd drove for five minutes. >> well, thank you so much, mr. chairman and i just think this is an outstanding panel. i guess i want to say that mr. giancarlo's comment about mr. gensler preferring the futures market over the swaps market because of this jurisdiction, i guess i find that rather provocative and i'll let him respond a little bit. i was more curious about what mr. parsons thought about mr. giancarlo's comment that this really creates a lot of regulatory arbitrage and unintended consequences as an economist. at like you to comment on that testimony. >> it's a very important problem in the cf to see us kind of between a rock and a hard place for two reasons. if you're talking about customized swaps, does it really different from futures and can only be dealt with in the otc swaps markets. for example, all these energy swaps that moved from swaps into futures, those are not customized. those are standardized instrument. they are treat on exchange effectively. they are clearer. this legacy to a standardized swaps and if you r
her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike about this? i was on bbc news and a woman told me i didn't deserve is because i -- i'm going to use that speakers on bbc so clearly she made no sense. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> reversely, i would just like to say i'm so happy that this is one of the top five issues. education is the fuel of knowledge, and knowledge is power. so by taking a stand and a more sustainable education we are essentially empowering young people. what we know and who who we are today relies heavily on education. many young people today are major untillized by the current education system and completely shut off. can you blame them if they can't see the light at the end of the tunnel? the education system doesn't tell is why we need to use these put do multipliered. doesn't make any sense. young people are 100% of the future and so why are we not investing in what makes us who we are today? doesn't make any sense. decisionmakers,
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10